Rachel’s Double Chocolate Chip Cookies

Screenshot_2020-01-14 Rachel Allen on Instagram “OHHH YESSSS These Double Chocolate Chip Cookies are possibly up there as m[...](3)

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rachelallen1

OHHH YESSSS….These Double Chocolate Chip Cookies are possibly up there as my very favourites. This is a perfect day for some cosy baking. Let me know how you get on.. see Recipe below from my book Rachel’s Everyday Kitchen , @harpercollinsire @harpercollinsuk #baking #cosy #cosybakingday #doublechocolate #doublechocolatechip #doublechocolatechipcookies Makes 20 large cookies-never enough
225g butter, softened

325g caster sugar

2 eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

225g flour

75g cocoa powder

1 tsp bicarbonate of soda

¼ tsp salt 175g dark chocolate chips Preheat the oven to 175’C.
Line 3 baking trays with parchment paper .

Place the butter in a mixing bowl and beat until very soft. Add in the sugar and beat to mix well. Continue to beat and add the eggs in one by one followed by the vanilla extract. Sift in the sifted flour, cocoa powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt and mix in until combined.

With wet hands, form the dough into balls the size of a golf ball (or use 2 soup spoons to scoop onto the tray) . Arrange on the tray , about 6 or 7 on each tray, leaving space for the cookies to spread.

If you’re using a fan oven, cook all three trays at once (at 150’ FAN ‘C). Cook for 9-11 minutes until they look slightly cracked on top. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for a few minutes, then remove from the tray and place on a wire rack to cool completely. PS- You can just bake a few and keep the cookie dough in the fridge rolled up into a salami shape in parchment paper, then slice to bake when you fancy. 🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪

Rachel’s Double Chocolate Chip Cookies

Screenshot_2020-01-14 Rachel Allen on Instagram “OHHH YESSSS These Double Chocolate Chip Cookies are possibly up there as m[...](3)

rachelallen1's profile picture

rachelallen1

OHHH YESSSS….These Double Chocolate Chip Cookies are possibly up there as my very favourites. This is a perfect day for some cosy baking. Let me know how you get on.. see Recipe below from my book Rachel’s Everyday Kitchen , @harpercollinsire @harpercollinsuk #baking #cosy #cosybakingday #doublechocolate #doublechocolatechip #doublechocolatechipcookies Makes 20 large cookies-never enough
225g butter, softened

325g caster sugar

2 eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

225g flour

75g cocoa powder

1 tsp bicarbonate of soda

¼ tsp salt 175g dark chocolate chips Preheat the oven to 175’C.
Line 3 baking trays with parchment paper .

Place the butter in a mixing bowl and beat until very soft. Add in the sugar and beat to mix well. Continue to beat and add the eggs in one by one followed by the vanilla extract. Sift in the sifted flour, cocoa powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt and mix in until combined.

With wet hands, form the dough into balls the size of a golf ball (or use 2 soup spoons to scoop onto the tray) . Arrange on the tray , about 6 or 7 on each tray, leaving space for the cookies to spread.

If you’re using a fan oven, cook all three trays at once (at 150’ FAN ‘C). Cook for 9-11 minutes until they look slightly cracked on top. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for a few minutes, then remove from the tray and place on a wire rack to cool completely. PS- You can just bake a few and keep the cookie dough in the fridge rolled up into a salami shape in parchment paper, then slice to bake when you fancy. 🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪

Rachel’s Double Chocolate Chip Cookies

Screenshot_2020-01-14 Rachel Allen on Instagram “OHHH YESSSS These Double Chocolate Chip Cookies are possibly up there as m[...](3)

rachelallen1's profile picture

rachelallen1

OHHH YESSSS….These Double Chocolate Chip Cookies are possibly up there as my very favourites. This is a perfect day for some cosy baking. Let me know how you get on.. see Recipe below from my book Rachel’s Everyday Kitchen , @harpercollinsire @harpercollinsuk #baking #cosy #cosybakingday #doublechocolate #doublechocolatechip #doublechocolatechipcookies Makes 20 large cookies-never enough
225g butter, softened

325g caster sugar

2 eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

225g flour

75g cocoa powder

1 tsp bicarbonate of soda

¼ tsp salt 175g dark chocolate chips Preheat the oven to 175’C.
Line 3 baking trays with parchment paper .

Place the butter in a mixing bowl and beat until very soft. Add in the sugar and beat to mix well. Continue to beat and add the eggs in one by one followed by the vanilla extract. Sift in the sifted flour, cocoa powder, bicarbonate of soda and salt and mix in until combined.

With wet hands, form the dough into balls the size of a golf ball (or use 2 soup spoons to scoop onto the tray) . Arrange on the tray , about 6 or 7 on each tray, leaving space for the cookies to spread.

If you’re using a fan oven, cook all three trays at once (at 150’ FAN ‘C). Cook for 9-11 minutes until they look slightly cracked on top. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for a few minutes, then remove from the tray and place on a wire rack to cool completely. PS- You can just bake a few and keep the cookie dough in the fridge rolled up into a salami shape in parchment paper, then slice to bake when you fancy. 🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪🍪

Rachel Allen’s Crab and Blood Orange Salad

Rachel Allen's Crab and Blood Orange Salad. This zesty, fresh salad serves 4 - 6 as a starter or light lunch.

Rachel Allen’s Crab and Blood Orange Salad. This zesty, fresh salad serves 4 – 6 as a starter or light lunch.
This zesty, fresh salad serves 4 – 6 as a starter or light lunch.

Ingredients

  • 3 blood oranges (use regular when not in season)
  • 400 g (14oz) cooked crab meat
  • 1 small red onion, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 ripe avocados, halved, stone removed, peeled and cut into roughly 1cm (½in) dice
  • 50 ml (2fl oz) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to serve
  • 1 tblsp sherry vinegar
  • 2 tblsp chopped dill (chopped coriander or parsley leaves also work well if you don’t have dill)
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • few handfuls of salad greens, to serve

Method

How to cook the crab:

  1. First, weigh the crab. Then place the crab in the freezer for two hours. Once the freezing time is up, remove the crabs from the freezer and place in a large saucepan, cover with measured warm water and add 1 tablespoon of salt for every 1.2 litres (2 pints) water. The crab can be cooked in seawater, but omit the salt). Bring to the boil, then turn the heat down and simmer on a medium heat for 20 minutes for 450g (1lb).
  2. Pour off about two thirds of the water, cover with a lid and continue to cook for a further six minutes. To check if the crab is cooked, use an oven glove or tea towel to lift it out of the pan. Then gently shake it quite close to your ear – you shouldn’t hear liquid splashing around. Remove the crab and allow to cool.
  3. When the crab has cooled, remove the large claws and crakc these (using a heavy weight or nutcrackers), then, using the handle of a tablespoon, extract every bit of meat. Retain the shell if you’d like it to serve the meat in, otherwise discard. Turn the body of the crab upside down and pull out the centre portion. Discard the gills, known as ‘dead man’s fingers’ and each about 4cm (1½ inch) long. Scoop out all the lovely brown meat and add it to the white meat from the claws. The meat can be used immediately or frozen for future use.

To make the salad:

  1. First segment the oranges: cut a little slice from the top and bottom of the fruit. Next, stand the orange on a chopping board and, using a small sharp knife and following the curve of the orange, cut a strip of peel off from top to bottom. Continue around the orange until there is no peel remaining. Hold the orange over a bowl, then cut a segment out by slipping the knife in between one of the segments and the connective membrane.
  2. Cut down until you reach the middle of the orange, but don’t cut through the membrane. Make another cut the other side of the segment against the other membrane and you will be left with a perfect segment, with no membrane. Repeat with the rest of the oranges, then squeeze the juice out from the pieces of peel and inner membrane over the segments in the bowl.
  3. Add the crab meat, onion and avocado to the bowl and toss gently. Drizzle the olive oil and vinegar over, then add the chopped herbs and season with salt and pepper. Toss again, gently, so as not to break up the orange segments.
  4. Place a small handful of salad greens on each plate, or all together on one large platter, drizzle with a little olive oil, then spoon the crab and blood orange salad over the top and serve.

https://www.rte.ie/lifestyle/recipes/2015/1005/743157-crab-and-blood-orange-salad/

 

Rachel Allen’s Crab and Blood Orange Salad

Rachel Allen's Crab and Blood Orange Salad. This zesty, fresh salad serves 4 - 6 as a starter or light lunch.

Rachel Allen’s Crab and Blood Orange Salad. This zesty, fresh salad serves 4 – 6 as a starter or light lunch.
This zesty, fresh salad serves 4 – 6 as a starter or light lunch.

Ingredients

  • 3 blood oranges (use regular when not in season)
  • 400 g (14oz) cooked crab meat
  • 1 small red onion, peeled and thinly sliced
  • 2 ripe avocados, halved, stone removed, peeled and cut into roughly 1cm (½in) dice
  • 50 ml (2fl oz) extra virgin olive oil, plus extra to serve
  • 1 tblsp sherry vinegar
  • 2 tblsp chopped dill (chopped coriander or parsley leaves also work well if you don’t have dill)
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • few handfuls of salad greens, to serve

Method

How to cook the crab:

  1. First, weigh the crab. Then place the crab in the freezer for two hours. Once the freezing time is up, remove the crabs from the freezer and place in a large saucepan, cover with measured warm water and add 1 tablespoon of salt for every 1.2 litres (2 pints) water. The crab can be cooked in seawater, but omit the salt). Bring to the boil, then turn the heat down and simmer on a medium heat for 20 minutes for 450g (1lb).
  2. Pour off about two thirds of the water, cover with a lid and continue to cook for a further six minutes. To check if the crab is cooked, use an oven glove or tea towel to lift it out of the pan. Then gently shake it quite close to your ear – you shouldn’t hear liquid splashing around. Remove the crab and allow to cool.
  3. When the crab has cooled, remove the large claws and crakc these (using a heavy weight or nutcrackers), then, using the handle of a tablespoon, extract every bit of meat. Retain the shell if you’d like it to serve the meat in, otherwise discard. Turn the body of the crab upside down and pull out the centre portion. Discard the gills, known as ‘dead man’s fingers’ and each about 4cm (1½ inch) long. Scoop out all the lovely brown meat and add it to the white meat from the claws. The meat can be used immediately or frozen for future use.

To make the salad:

  1. First segment the oranges: cut a little slice from the top and bottom of the fruit. Next, stand the orange on a chopping board and, using a small sharp knife and following the curve of the orange, cut a strip of peel off from top to bottom. Continue around the orange until there is no peel remaining. Hold the orange over a bowl, then cut a segment out by slipping the knife in between one of the segments and the connective membrane.
  2. Cut down until you reach the middle of the orange, but don’t cut through the membrane. Make another cut the other side of the segment against the other membrane and you will be left with a perfect segment, with no membrane. Repeat with the rest of the oranges, then squeeze the juice out from the pieces of peel and inner membrane over the segments in the bowl.
  3. Add the crab meat, onion and avocado to the bowl and toss gently. Drizzle the olive oil and vinegar over, then add the chopped herbs and season with salt and pepper. Toss again, gently, so as not to break up the orange segments.
  4. Place a small handful of salad greens on each plate, or all together on one large platter, drizzle with a little olive oil, then spoon the crab and blood orange salad over the top and serve.

https://www.rte.ie/lifestyle/recipes/2015/1005/743157-crab-and-blood-orange-salad/

 

Rhubarb & Custard Swiss Roll: Rachel Allen

rachel rhubarb and custard

A delicious classic recipe for a very classy cake.

Ingredients

  • butter (melted, for greasing)
  • 4 eggs
  • 125 g (41/2 oz) caster sugar (plus 3 tbsp for sprinkling)
  • 2 tblsp warm water
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 125 g (41/2 oz) plain flour (plus extra for dusting)
  • for the filling
  • 200 g (7oz) rhubarb (about 2 stalks, trimmed), cut into 5mm (1/4 in) slices
  • 125 g (41/2 oz) caster sugar
  • 200 ml (7fl oz) milk
  • 1 vanilla pod, split lengthways, or 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3 egg yolks
  • 15 g (1/2 oz) cornflour
  • 100 ml (31/2 fl oz) whipped double or regular cream (measured when whipped)

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 190°C (375°F/Gas 5). Line the base of the Swiss roll tin (25 x 38cm/ 10 x 15′) with baking parchment, brush the base and sides of the tin with melted butter and dust with flour.
  2. Using a hand-held electric beater or an electric food mixer, whisk together the eggs, caster sugar, water and vanilla extract until light and fluffy.
  3. Sift in the flour, about one-third at a time, and fold it into the mixture. Carefully pour the mixture into the prepared Swiss roll tin and bake in the oven for 12–15 minutes or until the centre of the sponge is slightly springy to the touch and the edges have shrunk a little from the sides of the tin.
  4. Take a piece of baking parchment slightly larger in size than the tin and spread out on a work surface.
  5. Sprinkle the paper evenly with caster sugar (this is to stop the cake sticking to the paper). Quickly flip the Swiss roll tin over onto the sugared paper, then carefully remove the tin and baking parchment from the bottom of the cake.
  6. Place a clean, slightly damp tea towel over the cake while it cools – this will prevent it drying out and cracking when you roll it.
  7. Meanwhile, make the filling. Place the rhubarb in a saucepan with 75g (3oz) of the caster sugar and 25ml (1fl oz) of water and place on a medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Bring to the boil and allow to boil, uncovered and stirring regularly, for 10–15 minutes or until the rhubarb is completely soft and the mixture is quite thick.
  8. Tip out onto a plate and allow to cool.
  9. Next make the custard. Place the milk and the split vanilla pod (if using) in another pan and bring to the boil.
  10. Whisk the egg yolks (and vanilla extract, if using) with the remaining sugar (I like to use a hand-held electric beater for this) for a few minutes or until pale and light. Then briefly whisk in the cornflour.
  11. Pour the hot milk and vanilla pod (if using) onto the egg mixture, whisking as you pour, then tip it all back into the saucepan and cook, stirring all the time, over a low heat for a few minutes or until it forms a thick custard.
  12. Pour it into a bowl and allow to cool, then fold in the cooled rhubarb and the whipped cream – you can leave it slightly marbled (not fully mixed) if you prefer.
  13. When the sponge is completely cold, spread over the rhubarb and custard mixture, then, with one of the short sides facing you, roll up the Swiss roll away from you and carefully transfer to a serving plate.
  14. Sprinkle with a little extra caster sugar to finish, then cut into slices about 2cm (3/4in) thick to serve.