Mimosa Salad with Wild Garlic and Kalamata Olives: Rory O’Connell

rory salad rte 7516

“I make this salad all year round, varying the salad content according to the seasons and availability but I like it best of all in spring” says Rory.

Rory says: “Mixed organic leaves are the most obvious option but the salad works very well with just crispy watercress or chicory leaves. Wild garlic leaves are a great addition in spring as are the pretty white garlic flowers. As always choose the best quality oil and vinegar and measure accurately to ensure a correct balance of acidity in the dressing.

“Free-range eggs, hard boiled and yolks sieved are what create the mimosa effect here and hence the use of the word in the recipe title.

“I like to use fat and fleshy Kalamata olives which stone and chop easily. Be careful when assembling the salad to get the balance of ingredients correct. Remember this is a salad, so it is a selection of leaves which are lightly garnished with the other ingredients. Too much egg will make the salad seem too heavy, too much olive will overpower and equally too much parmesan will be too rich. The ingredients should tickle one another as you eat them giving an overall effect of lightness gilded with a few precious extras.”

Tips:

  • A selection of spring salad greens or a specific leaf like watercress or chicory can be used here.
  • Try and get free-range or organic eggs.
  • Large fleshy olives like Kalamata are perfect here. To stone an olive, place one at a time on a chopping board and press with the back of a chopping knife to press out the stone. Otherwise use an olive stoner if you have one.
  • Using a swivel headed vegetable peeler, shave the parmesan thinly off a larger piece straight on to the salads. Don’t worry if the parmesan breaks up a little and certainly perfect curls are of no advantage here, in fact perfect curls of parmesan can indicate an immature cheese.
  • Much of what is sold as balsamic vinegar is of poor quality, so search out a quality vinegar and if in doubt about the quality, replace it in the recipe with lemon juice of a good sherry vinegar.

Ingredients:

  • 4 hand-fulls of organic mixed leaves: watercress, wild garlic, butterhead, chicory leaves, chervil sprigs, coarsely chopped spring chives, basically whatever is at its freshest and best
  • 2 eggs
  • 16 fat Kalamata olives
  • 12 thin parmesan shavings or pieces

Dressing:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 small clove of garlic, peeled and finely crushed
  • pinch of salt and pepper

Method:

  1. Hard boil the eggs by lowering them gently into a saucepan of boiling, salted water and cooking them at a boil for exactly 10 minutes. If you don’t want the yolk completely hard, cook for 9 minutes. The salt in the water seasons the egg and will help to coagulate any white that might seep out of a crack in the shell, hence less leakage.
  2. Remove from the saucepan immediately and cool under a cold running tap. Remove the shell and cut the hard boiled eggs in half.
  3. Chop the white finely.
  4. Pass the yolk through a sieve, using the back of a soup spoon to push the egg through to achieve a mimosa type effect. Keep the chopped white and sieved yolk separate.
  5. Stone the olives by gently squashing them on a chopping board with the back of a chopping knife and removing the stones.
  6. Chop the olive flesh finely and reserve.
  7. Mix the ingredients for the dressing together, taste and correct seasoning.

To assemble the salad:

  1. Place the leaves in a large bowl and dress with just enough dressing to make the leaves glisten.
  2. On four large plates, first place a wide broken circle of the chopped olive on each plate.
  3. Divide and spread the egg white in the centre of the circles of olive.
  4. Place the leaves in a light pile on top of the egg white.
  5. Gently, place 3 parmesan shavings or pieces on each salad. Finally sprinkle the egg yolk “mimosa” on each salad.
  6. Serve immediately.

http://www.rte.ie/lifestyle/food/recipes/2016/0505/786264-spring-mimosa-salad/

Rory O’Connell’s Tuscan Apple, Lemon & Almond Cake






Food on RTÉ

@RTEfood
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Crisp on top and full of plump, juicy apples, this Tuscan tart is simply delicious.

By Rory O’Connell

Celebrity Chef

I am never quite sure if I should be calling this a cake or a tart but in any event, it is delicious and quite easy to make.

Ingredients

I am never quite sure if I should be calling this a cake or a tart but in any event, it is delicious and quite easy to make.

The origins of the recipe are from Tuscany in Italy but I like to use highly perfumed Irish dessert apples when in season. Look out for some lesser known but very delicious Irish dessert apples such as Irish Peach and Ardcairn Russet. 
 
Serves
 

  • 10g butter melted for greasing the parchment paper 
  • 4 dessert apples 
  • Finely grated zest of 2 lemons 
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
  • 250g caster sugar 
  • 2 eggs 
  • 150ml cream 
  • 110g butter melted and cooled 
  • 125g whole almonds, blanched, peeled and ground to a fine powder in a food processer or ground almonds 
  • 110g plain flour sieved 
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder sieved 
  •  100g of apricot jam 
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice, warmed and sieved 
  •  2 tablespoons of chopped sweet geranium leaves ( optional) 

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 180c / 350 f / gas 4 
  2. Line a 28cm flan ring with a removable base with a disc of parchment paper. The paper should in one piece cover the base and sides of the tin and come up 1cm above the edge of the tin. Brush the paper with a little melted butter.
  3. Peel, core and quarter the apples and slice into c 3mm slices. Mix with the lemon zest. Whisk the vanilla, sugar, and eggs to a thick and light consistency similar to a batter. Whisk in the cream and cooled melted butter. Fold in the almonds, flour and baking powder. Add ¾ of the sliced apples, being careful not to break the apple slices.
  4. Pour the mixture into the prepared flan ring and gently smooth over the surface. Scatter the remaining apples over the surface and sprinkle with 1 dessertspoon of caster sugar.
  5. Place in the preheated oven and cook for 20 minutes. Reduce the temperature to 160c etc and cook for a further 40 minutes by which time the tart will feel gently set. It may be necessary to cover the tart during the cooking with a sheet of parchment paper if the tart is getting too dark.
  6. Remove from the oven and allow to cool slightly. While the tart is still warm, Paint the surfaced with the warm sieved apricot jam to achieve a glossy glaze and if using the chopped geranium, sprinkle on immediately after glazing the tart. 
  7.  Serve warm with softly whipped cream. 

Coffee Crème Brûlée with Nougatine Biscuits#ballymaloe

Screenshot_2020-05-12 Ballymaloe Cookery School ( ballymaloecookeryschool) • Instagram photos and videos

Coffee Crème Brûlée with Nougatine Biscuits

Serve this icy cold in one large dish or individual ramekins. Serve with Nougatine biscuits as an extra treat or even ladyfingers.

 

Serves 4

200ml (7fl oz/scant 1 cup) milk

200ml (7fl oz/scant 1 cup) cream

4 large or 5 small organic egg yolks

40g (1 1/2oz/scant 1/4 cup) castor sugar

1 1/2 tablespoon (1 3/4 American tablespoons) Camp coffee essence

4 dessertspoons (1 American tablespoon) Demerara sugar

1 ovenproof dish (19cm wide x 4.5cm deep/(7 1/2 x 1 3/4 inch) or 4 ramekins x 100ml (3 1/2fl oz/scant 1/2 cup) each capacity

Preheat the oven to 150ºC / 300ºF /Gas Mark 2

Put the milk and cream into a heavy bottomed saucepan and bring to the boil. Whisk the egg yolks with the sugar, gradually pour the boiling liquid over the egg yolks whisking all the time. Add the coffee and whisk again.  Pour the mixture through the sieve into an ovenproof dish or 4 ramekins.

Bake in a bain-marie in the preheated oven for about 25-30 minutes until just set but slightly wobbly in the centre, or 40-45 minutes for the individual ramekins. (Shallow wide dishes cook faster, 20 minutes approximately.)

Cool, cover with cling film and chill well.

Sprinkle with Demerara sugar – it should be a thin layer, tip off excess if necessary. Glaze with a blow torch. Coffee crème brûlée is already very rich but serve with a little pouring cream if you must and some nougatine biscuits or ladyfingers.

Nougatine Biscuits

My brother Rory O’Connell makes these lacy and deliciously crisp biscuits, they keep perfectly for several days. Serve them with ice creams, sorbets, mousses and soufflés. They are also perfect with perfectly ripe fruit such as pears or peaches.

175g (6oz) nuts, a mixture, or the entire quantity of a single nut such as almonds, walnuts, pecan nuts and Brazil nuts. Hazelnuts may also be used but should be roasted and peeled before chopping

150g (5oz/generous 1/2 cup) caster or granulated sugar

3/4 teaspoon apple pectin

125g (4 1/2oz/generous 1 stick) butter

50g (2oz/1/4 cup) glucose syrup

2 teaspoons water

Preheat the oven to 190°C / 375ºF / Gas Mark 5

Chop the nuts in a food processor, using the pulse button, to render them to a semi-coarse texture.

In a small saucepan, combine the remaining ingredients and cook on a very low heat just until the mixture is melted and smooth. Add the nuts and stir to mix.

Using a silicone baking mat or an oven tray lined with parchment paper, drop on scant teaspoons of the mixture allowing plenty of room for the mixture to spread as it cooks. A standard oven tray, 40cm x 35cm (15 x 13 inch), will accommodate about 4 biscuits this size. You can of course make smaller biscuits by reducing the amount of mixture.

Cook for about 10 minutes or until the biscuits have spread into lacy and lightly caramelised flat crisps.

The cooked biscuits will be soft and molten when removing from the oven so allow the biscuits to cool slightly on the tray before removing to a wire rack to cool.

Any remaining uncooked mixture will store perfectly in the fridge for up to 5 days.

04/11/2019 (PB) (23454)

https://www.fromballymaloewithlove.com/recipes/coffee-creme-brulee-with-nougatine-biscuits

Rory’s blackberry and sweet geranium posset

Watch How to Cook Well with Rory O’Connell at 8:30pm on Tuesday evenings on RTÉ One.

By Rory O’Connell Celebrity Chef
More from
How to Cook Well, with Rory O’Connell


Watch How to Cook Well with Rory O’Connell at 8:30pm on Tuesday evenings on RTÉ One.
Ingredients
A classic lemon posset or set cream is a simple and lovely thing and my version here with blackberries and sweet geranium leaves is I believe a good and delicious variation on the theme. It is remarkable how easy this is and how without the aid of egg or gelatine, the mixture sets into a tender chilled pudding. I like the possets served straight from the fridge, so nice and chilly. 
I often make this during the winter months using wild blackberries that I have frozen in the late summer or early autumn. If you are using frozen berries, use them straight from the freezer. I never cease to be amazed by the value one gets from a few bags of frozen fruit when fresh local fruit is simply not an option due to the seasons.  
A little softly whipped cream is the perfect accompaniment along with a fresh organic or crystallised rose petal. The combination of rose and blackberry is a marriage made in heaven and I might be tempted to add a few drops of rose water to the cream when whipping. Be careful though as too much rose water will yield a flavour that is too strong and overpowering. The flavour of the rosewater cream should be akin to catching the scent of a rose while walking about the garden – there but almost illusive.
If you do not have the lemon or rose-scented geranium, you can just leave it out. The fragrant leaves do however bring a magical element to the dish. The plants are easily found at good garden centres and can be treated as a house plant living on a bright window-sill or if the weather is mild where you live, they can spend spring, summer and autumn out of doors in a sheltered sunny spot. I can’t imagine not having one of these plants for the ravishing flavour to bring to certain dishes. In fact, it is the sort of magic that one receives from this rather innocuous looking leaf that humbles and mesmerises me and reminds me every time I use it, how astonishing nature is and how fortunate that my career has brought me down this path where I handle these treasures all of the time. Oh, joy.
The possets can be served in little cups or glasses or the prettiest receptacle you like to use. The portions are quite small as this is quite a rich little dish but I always think it is better to be longing for one more spoonful rather than being faced with too much food.
 A thin lacy biscuit such as the Nougatine biscuits would also be good here and I might be tempted to add a few drops of rose water to the cream when whipping. 
Serves
400ml cream
90g caster sugar
5 leaves of rose or lemon scented geranium
100g blackberries
50ml lemon juice.
Method
Place the cream, sugar, geranium leaves and blackberries in a small saucepan and bring to a bare simmer.
Stir the saucepan occasionally to encourage the sugar to dissolve. Maintain that bare simmer for 5 minutes. If the cream boils hard the texture and consistency of the posset will be spoiled. 
Remove the saucepan from the heat and stir in the lemon juice. You will notice the colour of the cream improving dramatically as soon as the lemon juice goes in.
Now strain the cream through a sieve to remove the geranium leaves and at the same time push as much of the blackberries through as possible. 
Pour the strained cream into 8 little cups or glasses and allow to cool before placing in the fridge for 3 hours to set.
The posset will keep perfectly in your fridge for several days. I like to cover them to protect the delicate flavour.
Serve with a little softly whipped cream and if you have them, a fresh or crystallised rose petal and a nougatine biscuit. 

Mimosa Salad with Wild Garlic and Kalamata Olives: Rory O’Connell

rory salad rte 7516

“I make this salad all year round, varying the salad content according to the seasons and availability but I like it best of all in spring” says Rory.

Rory says: “Mixed organic leaves are the most obvious option but the salad works very well with just crispy watercress or chicory leaves. Wild garlic leaves are a great addition in spring as are the pretty white garlic flowers. As always choose the best quality oil and vinegar and measure accurately to ensure a correct balance of acidity in the dressing.

“Free-range eggs, hard boiled and yolks sieved are what create the mimosa effect here and hence the use of the word in the recipe title.

“I like to use fat and fleshy Kalamata olives which stone and chop easily. Be careful when assembling the salad to get the balance of ingredients correct. Remember this is a salad, so it is a selection of leaves which are lightly garnished with the other ingredients. Too much egg will make the salad seem too heavy, too much olive will overpower and equally too much parmesan will be too rich. The ingredients should tickle one another as you eat them giving an overall effect of lightness gilded with a few precious extras.”

Tips:

  • A selection of spring salad greens or a specific leaf like watercress or chicory can be used here.
  • Try and get free-range or organic eggs.
  • Large fleshy olives like Kalamata are perfect here. To stone an olive, place one at a time on a chopping board and press with the back of a chopping knife to press out the stone. Otherwise use an olive stoner if you have one.
  • Using a swivel headed vegetable peeler, shave the parmesan thinly off a larger piece straight on to the salads. Don’t worry if the parmesan breaks up a little and certainly perfect curls are of no advantage here, in fact perfect curls of parmesan can indicate an immature cheese.
  • Much of what is sold as balsamic vinegar is of poor quality, so search out a quality vinegar and if in doubt about the quality, replace it in the recipe with lemon juice of a good sherry vinegar.

Ingredients:

  • 4 hand-fulls of organic mixed leaves: watercress, wild garlic, butterhead, chicory leaves, chervil sprigs, coarsely chopped spring chives, basically whatever is at its freshest and best
  • 2 eggs
  • 16 fat Kalamata olives
  • 12 thin parmesan shavings or pieces

Dressing:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 small clove of garlic, peeled and finely crushed
  • pinch of salt and pepper

Method:

  1. Hard boil the eggs by lowering them gently into a saucepan of boiling, salted water and cooking them at a boil for exactly 10 minutes. If you don’t want the yolk completely hard, cook for 9 minutes. The salt in the water seasons the egg and will help to coagulate any white that might seep out of a crack in the shell, hence less leakage.
  2. Remove from the saucepan immediately and cool under a cold running tap. Remove the shell and cut the hard boiled eggs in half.
  3. Chop the white finely.
  4. Pass the yolk through a sieve, using the back of a soup spoon to push the egg through to achieve a mimosa type effect. Keep the chopped white and sieved yolk separate.
  5. Stone the olives by gently squashing them on a chopping board with the back of a chopping knife and removing the stones.
  6. Chop the olive flesh finely and reserve.
  7. Mix the ingredients for the dressing together, taste and correct seasoning.

To assemble the salad:

  1. Place the leaves in a large bowl and dress with just enough dressing to make the leaves glisten.
  2. On four large plates, first place a wide broken circle of the chopped olive on each plate.
  3. Divide and spread the egg white in the centre of the circles of olive.
  4. Place the leaves in a light pile on top of the egg white.
  5. Gently, place 3 parmesan shavings or pieces on each salad. Finally sprinkle the egg yolk “mimosa” on each salad.
  6. Serve immediately.

http://www.rte.ie/lifestyle/food/recipes/2016/0505/786264-spring-mimosa-salad/