Neven Maguire’s Pan-fried Hake with Lemon and Herb Butter Sauce

pan-fried-hake-with-lemon-and-herb-butter-sauce2

 Of course this recipe is great with just parsley but experiment with a combination of soft fragrant herbs sauce as parsley, chives, tarragon or chervil depending on what’s available.

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 4 x 175g hake fillets, skin on and boned
  • 1 tablesp. olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 50g butter
  • ½ lemon, pips removed
  • 1 tablesp. chopped mixed herbs (parsley, chives and tarragon)

To Cook

Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan and add the seasoned hake fillets, skin side down. Cook for a couple of minutes until the skin is just beginning to crisp, then add little knobs of butter to the pan around each hake fillet and cook for another couple of minutes until the skin is crisp.

Turn the hake fillets over and cook for another 3-4 minutes until cooked through. This will depend on the thickness of the fillets. Transfer to warmed plates while you make the sauce.

Add the rest of the butter to the frying pan and allow it to gently melt over a moderate heat. When it has melted, add a squeeze of lemon juice and the herbs, swirling to combine. Season to taste. Spoon this sauce over the hake fillets and serve with steamed broccoli and some sautéed new potatoes.

Serving Suggestions

Steamed broccoli and sauté new potatoes

Tips

Above all be careful not to overcook the fish.  To check, gently prod the thickest part of the fish with a small knife.  If it is cooked, the flesh will look opaque and the flakes will separate easily.  If it isn’t done yet, it will still have the translucent look for raw fish.

Other fish you could use: Whiting, haddock or trout fillets

Nutritional Analysis per Serving

Protein: 39g 

Carbohydrates: 52g 

Fat: 26g 

Iron: 2.4mg 

Energy: 644kcal 

Glenilen Farm Blueberry Cheesecake Brûlée Pots

A wonderful make ahead dessert for Sunday lunch; you definitely won’t just make these once!

INGREDIENTS

  • 150g Glenilen Farm Natural Yoghurt
  • 140g blueberries
  • 50g caster sugar
  • Pinch ground cinnamon
  • Grated zest and juice ½ lemon
  • 200g Glenilen Farm Low Fat Cream Cheese
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 4 tbsp demerara sugar
  • 4 digestive biscuits (crumbled)

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Put the blueberries in a saucepan with 1tbsp of the caster sugar, cinnamon and lemon juice. Cover and cook for 5 minutes until the berries are juicy and soft. Add the cornflour paste and cook, stirring until thickened. Divide the berries between 4 Glenilen Farm glass ramekins and leave to cool for 10 minutes
  2. In a bowl, whisk the Glenilen Farm Low Fat Cream Cheese, Glenilen Farm Natural Yoghurt, vanilla and lemon zest with the remaining caster sugar. Add the crumbled digestive biscuits to the ramekins and top with the cream cheese mixture. Cover and chill for 1 hour
  3. Sprinkle each cheesecake with 1 tblsp demerara sugar, then mist with a water spray (as this helps to speed up the carmelisation) Heat the grill to high and place the ramekins under for 1-2 minutes until the sugar has melted or alternatively use a cook’s blowtorch. Return the pots to the fridge and cool for at least one hour or for up to a day before serving.

Molly Malone’s cockle and mussel chowder

molly malones chowder

Molly Malone was a beautiful girl who sold cockles and mussels and died tragically of a fever while still young, or so the song goes. Molly may not have been a real girl, but since at least the 17th century, there have been fishmongers on the streets of Dublin who sell ‘Cockles and Mussels, alive, alive, oh!’

Cockles, with their distinctive flavour and lovely curved shell, are traditionally eaten in Ireland with Oatcakes. If you can only find mussels, this chowder will be just as good.

Serve either as a substantial starter or with chunks of crusty bread as a meal in its own right.

Heat the sunflower oil in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the bacon and sauté for about 1 minute, until crisp and golden. Add the butter to the pan and melt. Then add the leek, carrot and potato. Reduce the heat to low and sauté gently for 4–5 minutes, until soft but not browned.

Meanwhile, prepare the cockles and mussels. Scrub the shells clean and discard any that remain open when you tap them against a hard surface. Remove the beard – the little fibrous tuft – from each mussel. Bring the wine to a boil in a large saucepan and add the cockles and mussels. Cover with a tight-fi tting lid and cook for 3–4 minutes, shaking the pan occasionally, until the shells have opened.

Remove from the heat, drain the shellfi sh in a colander, reserving the cooking juices, and discard any shells that remain closed. Return the shellfi sh to the empty pan to keep warm. Place a fine sieve over a measuring jug and strain the cooking liquid. You should have at least 600ml (1 pint); if not, add water to make up that quantity.

Add the pan juices and the milk to the bacon and vegetable mixture and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer for 6–8 minutes, until the potato is tender. Add the cream and simmer for another 2–3 minutes, until the soup is reduced and thickened slightly. Season with salt and pepper.

Meanwhile, remove half of the cockles and mussels from their shells and add them with the remaining cockles and mussels still in their shells to the chowder. Stir in the parsley and serve at once.

http://www.rachelallen.com/post/molly-malones-cockle-and-mussel-chowder

 

Baked Risotto with Roasted Asparagus@KerrygoldUSA

risotto with asparagus

Risotto. Creamy rice, a splash of wine, a big dollop of butter, and cheese, glorious cheese. What’s not to love about a dish like that? The infernal stirring, that’s what. It’s such a good, restorative, comforting dish, but really, who has the patience? Sure, it can be meditative, standing and stirring with Buddha-like calm as the wine cooks down, and ladle after ladle of broth plumps the rice. But, truly, can you give a handful of rice 30 minutes of unblinking attention while all manner of homework mayhem ignites in the other room? Here’s one way to eliminate the long stand, stir and stare: enlist your oven. Contrary to the stiff-necked (and armed) belief of cranky purists, you can bake a perfectly fine risotto. While it’s not completely stir-less, this method will cut your stove-top workout down to a couple dozen reps. And while the rice, onions and broth happily bake, you’ll have plenty of time and focus to roast asparagus with one hand, and put out homework fires with the other. And honestly, if you slipped a bit to one of those stiff-necked purists I’d bet you good money they’d never know.

Odlums Coconut Buns for baking with kids

Category

Baking with Kids

Cook Time15-20 mins

What you need:

  • 225g/8oz Odlums Cream Plain Flour
  • Pinch of Salt
  • 1 teaspoon Odlums Baking Powder
  • 75g/3oz Butter or Margarine
  • 75g/3oz Shamrock Golden Caster Sugar
  • 50g/2oz Shamrock Desiccated Coconut
  • 1 Egg, beaten
  • 150ml/¼pt Milk

To Decorate

  • Fruitfield Raspberry Jam
  • Extra Shamrock Desiccated Coconut

How to:

  1. Preheat oven to 200°C/400°F/Gas 6. Lightly grease 2 flat baking trays.
  2. Sieve the flour, salt and baking powder into a bowl.
  3. Rub in the butter or margarine until mixture resembles breadcrumbs.
  4. Add the sugar and coconut and mix well.
  5. Mix to a fairly stiff consistency with the egg and milk. Drop dessertspoonfuls of the mixture, spaced apart on the prepared tins. Makes about 12.
  6. Bake for 15-20 minutes until risen and golden brown. Remove from oven and transfer buns to wire tray to cool.
  7. Brush the top with jam and dip in the extra coconut.

Coconut Buns