Grilled Peaches with Cashel Blue Cheese

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Farmhouse Irish blue cheese made with grass-fed cow’s milk makes the perfect pairing for fresh grilled peaches. As an appetizer or a gourmet snack, they make for a sweet, creamy treat perfect for outdoor grilling. They can also be made on the stovetop using a grill pan for a year-round taste of Irish summer.

Prep:  5 minutes
Cook:  4 minutes
Serves:  4

Ingredients:
Directions:

Heat a gas or charcoal grill. Cut peaches in half and remove pits. With a melon baller, scoop out a little flesh to enlarge the cavity where the pit was removed. Brush peaches lightly with olive oil on both sides. Place peaches on grill, cut side down. Grill about 2 minutes or until grill marks form. Turn over and grill for 2 minutes more. Place peaches on a serving platter, cut side up. Fill holes where pit was removed with Kerrygold Cashel Blue Farmhouse Cheese and drizzle peaches with honey. Serve warm.

http://kerrygoldusa.com/recipes/grilled-peaches-with-cashel-blue-cheese/

Neven Maguire’s Pan-fried Hake with Lemon and Herb Butter Sauce

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 Of course this recipe is great with just parsley but experiment with a combination of soft fragrant herbs sauce as parsley, chives, tarragon or chervil depending on what’s available.

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 4 x 175g hake fillets, skin on and boned
  • 1 tablesp. olive oil
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 50g butter
  • ½ lemon, pips removed
  • 1 tablesp. chopped mixed herbs (parsley, chives and tarragon)

To Cook

Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan and add the seasoned hake fillets, skin side down. Cook for a couple of minutes until the skin is just beginning to crisp, then add little knobs of butter to the pan around each hake fillet and cook for another couple of minutes until the skin is crisp.

Turn the hake fillets over and cook for another 3-4 minutes until cooked through. This will depend on the thickness of the fillets. Transfer to warmed plates while you make the sauce.

Add the rest of the butter to the frying pan and allow it to gently melt over a moderate heat. When it has melted, add a squeeze of lemon juice and the herbs, swirling to combine. Season to taste. Spoon this sauce over the hake fillets and serve with steamed broccoli and some sautéed new potatoes.

Serving Suggestions

Steamed broccoli and sauté new potatoes

Tips

Above all be careful not to overcook the fish.  To check, gently prod the thickest part of the fish with a small knife.  If it is cooked, the flesh will look opaque and the flakes will separate easily.  If it isn’t done yet, it will still have the translucent look for raw fish.

Other fish you could use: Whiting, haddock or trout fillets

Nutritional Analysis per Serving

Protein: 39g 

Carbohydrates: 52g 

Fat: 26g 

Iron: 2.4mg 

Energy: 644kcal 

 http://www.bordbia.ie/consumer/recipes/fish/pages/panfriedhake.aspx

Baked Risotto with Roasted Asparagus@KerrygoldUSA

risotto with asparagus

Risotto. Creamy rice, a splash of wine, a big dollop of butter, and cheese, glorious cheese. What’s not to love about a dish like that? The infernal stirring, that’s what. It’s such a good, restorative, comforting dish, but really, who has the patience? Sure, it can be meditative, standing and stirring with Buddha-like calm as the wine cooks down, and ladle after ladle of broth plumps the rice. But, truly, can you give a handful of rice 30 minutes of unblinking attention while all manner of homework mayhem ignites in the other room? Here’s one way to eliminate the long stand, stir and stare: enlist your oven. Contrary to the stiff-necked (and armed) belief of cranky purists, you can bake a perfectly fine risotto. While it’s not completely stir-less, this method will cut your stove-top workout down to a couple dozen reps. And while the rice, onions and broth happily bake, you’ll have plenty of time and focus to roast asparagus with one hand, and put out homework fires with the other. And honestly, if you slipped a bit to one of those stiff-necked purists I’d bet you good money they’d never know.