Rachel’s Blueberry jelly

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Serves 4.

Place the fresh or frozen blueberries, whichever you’re using, and the lemon juice in a liquidiser and whizz for a few minutes until the mixture is very smooth. Then push it through a sieve and set it aside.

To make the syrup, put the water and the sugar in a saucepan on a medium heat. Stir it just until the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil, boil for 1 minute, then remove the saucepan from the heat and set it aside.

Place the gelatine sheets in a bowl of cold water and leave them to sit for 3-4 minutes, until they have softened. Then squeeze out the excess water and add them to the hot syrup. Stir until the gelatine leaves dissolve, reheating the syrup if it has cooled down. Once the gelatine has been added, allow the mixture to cool until it is almost at room temperature. (If it’s too hot, it will cook the blueberry and lemon mixture you add next, ruining the flavour.)

Add the blueberry and lemon mixture you set aside earlier to the gelatine syrup and stir together well, then divide the jelly between four glasses or cups and place them in the fridge to set – this should take about 3 to 4 hours.

Rachel’s Blueberry jelly

blueberry-jelly-gridServes 4.

Place the fresh or frozen blueberries, whichever you’re using, and the lemon juice in a liquidiser and whizz for a few minutes until the mixture is very smooth. Then push it through a sieve and set it aside.

To make the syrup, put the water and the sugar in a saucepan on a medium heat. Stir it just until the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil, boil for 1 minute, then remove the saucepan from the heat and set it aside.

Place the gelatine sheets in a bowl of cold water and leave them to sit for 3-4 minutes, until they have softened. Then squeeze out the excess water and add them to the hot syrup. Stir until the gelatine leaves dissolve, reheating the syrup if it has cooled down. Once the gelatine has been added, allow the mixture to cool until it is almost at room temperature. (If it’s too hot, it will cook the blueberry and lemon mixture you add next, ruining the flavour.)

Add the blueberry and lemon mixture you set aside earlier to the gelatine syrup and stir together well, then divide the jelly between four glasses or cups and place them in the fridge to set – this should take about 3 to 4 hours.

 http://www.rachelallen.com/post/blueberry-jelly

Top tips and recipes for blueberries from Rachel Allen

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Deliciously small and sweet, the blueberry is a lot more powerful than its modest size would lead you to believe. Nowadays hailed as a superfood, the blueberry has been enjoyed for many centuries by the Native Americans, who have long realised its potency in terms of high levels of antioxidants, as well as being hugely beneficial for the nervous system. It has also been claimed that the little purple berry packs a powerful punch for general brain health too, especially for improving memory – there’s an incentive for anyone who, like me, walks into a room for something and then cannot remember what that something is!
To get the maximum number of benefits of blueberries, however, they do need to be consumed raw, so make sure to keep a few punnets in the freezer for throwing into smoothies, juices and mueslis. It’s true, though, that the blueberries in the cheesecake recipe, opposite, are baked and so they are not as nutritious as raw berries, but the recipe is too divine to omit. The blueberry jellies, also opposite, are gorgeous, wobbly delights that both children and adults will love at the end of a meal, while the blueberry coulis recipe is a deliciously fresh, fruity sauce to pour over ice cream or even into the bottom of a glass of Cava – now there’s a good way to get your five-a-day if ever I heard one!

Blueberry Recipes:

 http://www.rachelallen.com/blog/top-tips-and-recipes-blueberries