Rachel Allen’s Divine Rich Chocolate Cake recipe


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Happy Sunday!
This Divine Rich Chocolate Cake recipe is from my 2nd cookbook, Rachel’s Favourite Food For Friends (published in 2005), that I come back to time & time again. This is a super quick to make and completely delicious cake that’s a bit brownie-like, a bit moussey-like, and can be made using ground almonds or flour, so super versatile. And, it keeps for ages, if you can keep it!
I made 2 this morning, one for home and one for a friend’s (belated) birthday!
Here’s the recipe below!
Serves 6-8
A little soft butter, for greasing the tin
150g dark chocolate, chopped
125g butter
150g caster sugar
3 eggs, whisked to break up
50g ground almonds or plain flour

For the Chocolate Glaze:
110g dark chocolate , chopped
2 tbsp milk or cream
50g butter

Preheat the oven to 160’C/Fan 145.
Butter the sides of a 20cm round cake tin (or spring form tin ) and line the bottom with grease proof or parchment paper.
Place the chocolate, butter and sugar in a bowl sitting over a saucepan of simmering water, and melt. Stir until smooth then beat in the eggs and fold in the ground almonds or sifted flour. Feel free to add orange zest, vanilla, sea salt, cardamom, ginger etc!
Pour the mixture into the cake tin and bake for 35-45 minutes until the centre feels just set in the centre, but it will still be gorgeously moist. Allow to cool in the tin .
To make the chocolate glaze , melt all the ingredients together and stir until smooth, allow to cool a little until it has thickened slightly ( about 10 minutes) but do not place in the fridge as it will lose it’s glossy sheen .
Take the cooled cake out of the tin and place on a plate or cake stand , and pour the glaze over the top , letting it drizzle down the sides.
#baking #rachelallencooks #chocolatecake #glutenfree1d

Rachel Allen’s asparagus and new potato salad

asparagus-potato-salad-poached-egg

First, place a saucepan of water on a high heat and add a good pinch of salt. Bring up to the boil then pop in the new potatoes, cover and boil for about 20-30 minutes until the potatoes are tender. While the potatoes are cooking, make the dressing by mixing the olive oil, the lemon juice, the chopped marjoram or tarragon, whichever you’re using, and some salt and pepper to season. When the potatoes are cooked, cut them into quarters while hot, place in a bowl and drizzle with some of the lemon and olive oil dressing and season with salt and pepper. Set aside but do not chill.

Place more water, with another pinch of salt, in the saucepan and bring to the boil on a high heat for cooking the asparagus. Prepare the asparagus by snapping off the woody ends at the base of the stalks, discard the snapped end. Next, using a peeler, peel away the slightly tough outer peel from about 2-3cm at the base of the stalks. When the water comes to the boil, drop in the asparagus and boil, uncovered, for about 4-6 minutes until tender. Remove the asparagus from the water but keep the water in the pot (for cooking the eggs) and place the asparagus stalks on a plate and immediately drizzle with some of the dressing.

Bring the water back to a boil again and crack in the eggs, turn the heat to medium to let the water simmer and poach the eggs for a few minutes until the whites are set and the yolks still soft. While the eggs are cooking, place the lettuce leaves in a bowl and drizzle with nearly all of the remaining dressing – enough to just make the leaves glisten. Divide the leaves between the plates and arrange the asparagus over or around or slightly peeping out from under the lettuce, then arrange the potatoes over or around and then place a perfectly poached egg sitting on top of each salad. To finish, peel a few shavings of the Coolea or Parmesan cheese, whichever you are using, for each plate and arrange over the top, drizzle with the last of the dressing, and serve.

 

Mimosa Salad with Wild Garlic and Kalamata Olives: Rory O’Connell

rory salad rte 7516

“I make this salad all year round, varying the salad content according to the seasons and availability but I like it best of all in spring” says Rory.

Rory says: “Mixed organic leaves are the most obvious option but the salad works very well with just crispy watercress or chicory leaves. Wild garlic leaves are a great addition in spring as are the pretty white garlic flowers. As always choose the best quality oil and vinegar and measure accurately to ensure a correct balance of acidity in the dressing.

“Free-range eggs, hard boiled and yolks sieved are what create the mimosa effect here and hence the use of the word in the recipe title.

“I like to use fat and fleshy Kalamata olives which stone and chop easily. Be careful when assembling the salad to get the balance of ingredients correct. Remember this is a salad, so it is a selection of leaves which are lightly garnished with the other ingredients. Too much egg will make the salad seem too heavy, too much olive will overpower and equally too much parmesan will be too rich. The ingredients should tickle one another as you eat them giving an overall effect of lightness gilded with a few precious extras.”

Tips:

  • A selection of spring salad greens or a specific leaf like watercress or chicory can be used here.
  • Try and get free-range or organic eggs.
  • Large fleshy olives like Kalamata are perfect here. To stone an olive, place one at a time on a chopping board and press with the back of a chopping knife to press out the stone. Otherwise use an olive stoner if you have one.
  • Using a swivel headed vegetable peeler, shave the parmesan thinly off a larger piece straight on to the salads. Don’t worry if the parmesan breaks up a little and certainly perfect curls are of no advantage here, in fact perfect curls of parmesan can indicate an immature cheese.
  • Much of what is sold as balsamic vinegar is of poor quality, so search out a quality vinegar and if in doubt about the quality, replace it in the recipe with lemon juice of a good sherry vinegar.

Ingredients:

  • 4 hand-fulls of organic mixed leaves: watercress, wild garlic, butterhead, chicory leaves, chervil sprigs, coarsely chopped spring chives, basically whatever is at its freshest and best
  • 2 eggs
  • 16 fat Kalamata olives
  • 12 thin parmesan shavings or pieces

Dressing:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons sunflower oil
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 1 small clove of garlic, peeled and finely crushed
  • pinch of salt and pepper

Method:

  1. Hard boil the eggs by lowering them gently into a saucepan of boiling, salted water and cooking them at a boil for exactly 10 minutes. If you don’t want the yolk completely hard, cook for 9 minutes. The salt in the water seasons the egg and will help to coagulate any white that might seep out of a crack in the shell, hence less leakage.
  2. Remove from the saucepan immediately and cool under a cold running tap. Remove the shell and cut the hard boiled eggs in half.
  3. Chop the white finely.
  4. Pass the yolk through a sieve, using the back of a soup spoon to push the egg through to achieve a mimosa type effect. Keep the chopped white and sieved yolk separate.
  5. Stone the olives by gently squashing them on a chopping board with the back of a chopping knife and removing the stones.
  6. Chop the olive flesh finely and reserve.
  7. Mix the ingredients for the dressing together, taste and correct seasoning.

To assemble the salad:

  1. Place the leaves in a large bowl and dress with just enough dressing to make the leaves glisten.
  2. On four large plates, first place a wide broken circle of the chopped olive on each plate.
  3. Divide and spread the egg white in the centre of the circles of olive.
  4. Place the leaves in a light pile on top of the egg white.
  5. Gently, place 3 parmesan shavings or pieces on each salad. Finally sprinkle the egg yolk “mimosa” on each salad.
  6. Serve immediately.

http://www.rte.ie/lifestyle/food/recipes/2016/0505/786264-spring-mimosa-salad/

Ballymaloe’s Famous Chocolate Orange Cake recipe

Weigh the eggs. Take the same weight in butter, sugar and flour. Beat the butter and sugar together until pale and light in texture. Wash the oranges and add the finely grated rind of 2 and the juice of 1 to the butter mixture. Mix the flour and baking powder and add alternately with the eggs. Beat thoroughly. Bake in a 24cm (91/2in) tin in a moderate oven, 180°C/350°F/gas 4, for 50 minutes approx. Cool the cake and split it in two. Sandwich with the orange butter icing and spread the chocolate icing over the top and sides allowing any excess to run off.
To make the orange butter icing, finely grate the rind of the orange and squeeze out the juice. Beat the icing sugar, butter and orange rind together. Add in enough juice to make the icing a spreading consistency.
To make the chocolate icing, melt the chocolate in the water. Remove from the heat and beat in the butter and then the eggs very thoroughly. Leave to cool and set before icing and filling the cake.
Serves 12

For the Orange Cake:

  • 4 eggs
  • softened butter
  • sugar
  • plain flour
  • 2 oranges
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder

For the orange butter icing:

  • 1 orange
  • 110g (4oz, 1/2 cup) icing sugar
  • 55g (2oz, 1/4 cup) softened butter

For the chocolate icing:

  • 170g (6oz) chocolate
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 50g (2oz, 4 tablespoons) softened butter
  • 2 large eggs

 

Rory O’Connell’s Tuscan Apple, Lemon & Almond Cake






Food on RTÉ

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Crisp on top and full of plump, juicy apples, this Tuscan tart is simply delicious.

By Rory O’Connell

Celebrity Chef

I am never quite sure if I should be calling this a cake or a tart but in any event, it is delicious and quite easy to make.

Ingredients

I am never quite sure if I should be calling this a cake or a tart but in any event, it is delicious and quite easy to make.

The origins of the recipe are from Tuscany in Italy but I like to use highly perfumed Irish dessert apples when in season. Look out for some lesser known but very delicious Irish dessert apples such as Irish Peach and Ardcairn Russet. 
 
Serves
 

  • 10g butter melted for greasing the parchment paper 
  • 4 dessert apples 
  • Finely grated zest of 2 lemons 
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 
  • 250g caster sugar 
  • 2 eggs 
  • 150ml cream 
  • 110g butter melted and cooled 
  • 125g whole almonds, blanched, peeled and ground to a fine powder in a food processer or ground almonds 
  • 110g plain flour sieved 
  • 1 ½ teaspoons baking powder sieved 
  •  100g of apricot jam 
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice, warmed and sieved 
  •  2 tablespoons of chopped sweet geranium leaves ( optional) 

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 180c / 350 f / gas 4 
  2. Line a 28cm flan ring with a removable base with a disc of parchment paper. The paper should in one piece cover the base and sides of the tin and come up 1cm above the edge of the tin. Brush the paper with a little melted butter.
  3. Peel, core and quarter the apples and slice into c 3mm slices. Mix with the lemon zest. Whisk the vanilla, sugar, and eggs to a thick and light consistency similar to a batter. Whisk in the cream and cooled melted butter. Fold in the almonds, flour and baking powder. Add ¾ of the sliced apples, being careful not to break the apple slices.
  4. Pour the mixture into the prepared flan ring and gently smooth over the surface. Scatter the remaining apples over the surface and sprinkle with 1 dessertspoon of caster sugar.
  5. Place in the preheated oven and cook for 20 minutes. Reduce the temperature to 160c etc and cook for a further 40 minutes by which time the tart will feel gently set. It may be necessary to cover the tart during the cooking with a sheet of parchment paper if the tart is getting too dark.
  6. Remove from the oven and allow to cool slightly. While the tart is still warm, Paint the surfaced with the warm sieved apricot jam to achieve a glossy glaze and if using the chopped geranium, sprinkle on immediately after glazing the tart. 
  7.  Serve warm with softly whipped cream. 

Rachel’s Blueberry jelly

blueberry-jelly-grid

Serves 4.

Place the fresh or frozen blueberries, whichever you’re using, and the lemon juice in a liquidiser and whizz for a few minutes until the mixture is very smooth. Then push it through a sieve and set it aside.

To make the syrup, put the water and the sugar in a saucepan on a medium heat. Stir it just until the sugar has dissolved, then bring to the boil, boil for 1 minute, then remove the saucepan from the heat and set it aside.

Place the gelatine sheets in a bowl of cold water and leave them to sit for 3-4 minutes, until they have softened. Then squeeze out the excess water and add them to the hot syrup. Stir until the gelatine leaves dissolve, reheating the syrup if it has cooled down. Once the gelatine has been added, allow the mixture to cool until it is almost at room temperature. (If it’s too hot, it will cook the blueberry and lemon mixture you add next, ruining the flavour.)

Add the blueberry and lemon mixture you set aside earlier to the gelatine syrup and stir together well, then divide the jelly between four glasses or cups and place them in the fridge to set – this should take about 3 to 4 hours.